Analytical Sciences


Call for Papers


Volume 34, Number 6 (2018)

Frontiers of Plasma Spectrochemistry in Analytical Chemistry

OPlasma spectrochemistry, such as inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), glow discharge spectrometry (GDS) and other atomic spectrochemical methods, is used worldwide as highly sensitive and precise elemental analytical methods in various fields of science, technology and industry. In November 2017, the 7th Asia-Pacific Winter Conference on Plasma Spectrochemistry (APWC) will be held in Matsue, Japan, where many excellent researches will appear and fruitful discussion will result in new findings. In collaboration with the international conference, we are planning to create a special issue entitled “Frontiers of Plasma Spectrochemistry in Analytical Chemistry” in June 2018 for reviewing state-of-the-art plasma spectrochemistry and the related spectrochemical analyses.

Over thirty years have passed since a commercial ICP-MS was launched onto the market; nowadays, there is no analytical laboratory without an ICP-OES or ICP-MS in the world. ICP-OES and ICP-MS with multielement determination capabilities brought about an extremely high detection power of pg/g (ppt) level to elemental analysis, while, ICP-MS familiarized isotope dilution analysis as a primary method of analytical chemistry. Hyphenated ICP methods, such as high-performance liquid chromatography-ICP (HPLC-ICP) and capillary electrophoresis-ICP (CE-ICP), are now among key technologies in environmental science, bio-chemistry, clinical chemistry, food security science and so on, and have recently created a new science field of Metallomics.

Moreover, ICP-MS, which has highly precise isotope measurement capability, is being widely applied to dating and origin identification in cosmic science, earth science and geochemistry. Laser-assisted ICP-MS is used for elemental imaging and micro-area isotope measurements. Single-particle measurements and single cell analysis with ICP-MS are being diligently studied by many researchers. Those measurement methods are expected to support the dawn of new scientific fields.

On the other hand, fundamental studies concerning plasma have made great progress. The excellent diagnostics of glow discharge significantly improves both GDS and GDMS, which are widely used for direct elemental analysis, surface analysis and the depth-profiling analysis of solid samples. Various kinds of new plasma sources for the spectrochemistry are also being developed. They are expected to be promising plasma sources for elemental analysis as well as molecular analysis.

The guest editors are very happy to see a good variety of special-issue papers concerning recent progress of plasma spectrochemistry in analytical chemistry, for which we greatly thank the contributing authors. We believe that further progress will be made in these fields.


Volume 34, Number 1 (2018)

Paper-based Analytical Devices

Over the last decade, the development of paper-based analytical devices (PADs), in particular microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (μPADs), has rapidly evolved into a highly active research field with a yearly increasing number of publications and conference presentations related to the topic. A major driving force for their development is the need for more affordable and simple analytical devices, since there are many circumstances where expensive instruments are unavailable, and trained experts are absent. In these situations, (μ)PADs are promising tools suitable for end-user applications at the points of need.

We are very happy to announce a special issue of Analytical Sciences devoted to “Paper-based Analytical Devices”, which is scheduled for publication in January 2018. This special issue will provide an up-to-date overview of research activities and achievements related to (μ)PADs. In this context, the term “paper” is widely interpreted to include a variety of fibrous porous materials, and is not limited to its classical meaning. Contributions covering the topic from different perspectives are very welcome, including for example the introduction of new materials, detection methods, microfluidic patterning approaches and target analytes, as well as more application-specific reports concerning on-device sample pretreatment, reagent storage and release, signal enhancement and flow control, among others. Applications of particular interest include clinical diagnostics at point-of-care, food and nutrition safety monitoring, environmental on-site analysis, and workplace safety monitoring. Common essential features to all paper-based devices and applications are low cost, simple fabrication and ease of use.

All manuscripts submitted for publication will undergo the journal’s standard reviewing process. As Guest Editors, we are looking forward to receiving many contributions from an international authorship, hopefully making this special issue on “Paper-based Analytical Devices”, a valuable collection of innovative reports of high interest to both veteran researchers and newcomers to this field.


Volume 33, Number 4 (2017)

Optical Waveguide and Attenuated Total-Reflection Spectroscopy

The interaction between an evanescent field, which is caused by the attenuated total-reflection (ATR) of incident light on an interface, and molecules existing and/or adsorbed on the interface induces light absorption, light emission, and Raman scattering from these molecules. There phenomena have great importance for in situ observations of interfacial phenomena and species. A slab optical waveguide is one of the key tools that combine ATR and multiple reflection. This is, thus, surface selective and highly- sensitive. Additionally, ATR is utilized as a signal enhancement principle, for example, in surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and surface-enhanced Raman scattering. These phenomena bring us much information to understand interfacial reactions, and support the development of nano-devices. Accordingly, those achievements have been tremendously developing analytical research activities.

We are planning to have a special issue of Analytical Sciences entitled “Optical Waveguide and Attenuated Total-Reflection Spectroscopy” in April of 2017, in order to take a top-down view at recent interfacial engineering and scientific progress. Both basic and application work will be accepted if they represent novel results of significance and interest in these fields. Submitted papers will be reviewed according to the regular procedure of the journal. As Guest Editors, we would like to invite you to contribute a paper to this special issue.


Volume 33, Number 1 (2017)

Frontiers of Vibrational Spectroscopy in Analytical Chemistry

We proudly announce a publication plan involving a special issue titled “Frontiers of Vibrational Spectroscopy in Analytical Chemistry” in January 2017.

The purpose of this special issue is to review the state of the art of vibrational spectroscopy in analytical chemistry. To do this we would like to collect many exciting papers from all over the world. This special issue will cover infrared (IR), Raman, near-infrared (NIR), Terahertz (THz)/far-infrared (FIR) and nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy. It will consider not only applications of vibrational spectroscopy in analytical chemistry, but also the development of instruments and spectral-analysis methods.

In 2007, Analytical Sciences published a similar special issue titled “Advanced Vibrational Spectroscopy—from Near-infrared to Terahertz”. This issue contained nearly 30 papers on a variety of applications involving vibrational spectroscopy in analytical chemistry. Since that time, vibrational spectroscopy in analytical chemistry has demonstrated marked progress concerning various aspects, such as instrumentation, spectral analysis, and applications. One example of recent progress is THz spectroscopy. It has opened up a new area in analytical vibrational spectroscopy.

Vibrational spectroscopy imaging is another novel and powerful technique involving a variety of application fields from nanomaterials to medicine. Remarkable advances have also come from vibrational spectroscopy in nanoscience and technology, e.g. tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) and nano-IR spectroscopy. Quantum chemical calculations have been introduced very strongly into vibrational spectroscopy from NIR to Terahertz.

Another progress is found in “surface spectroscopy” involving both linear and nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy. Based on a deep understanding of surface spectroscopy involving electrodynamics coupled with chemometrics, new analytical techniques have been developed. P-polarized multiple-angle incidence resolution spectrometry (pMAIRS) equipped with FT-IR is now at a practical stage, especially for the analysis of organic thin-film semiconductor devices. The advancement of sum-frequency generation (SFG) is also of great importance, which is becoming more powerful not only for thin films, but also for surface structures of bulk liquid and polymeric materials.

To understand the above notable progress, it is important to collect many papers in one issue. Therefore, we strongly encourage all researchers to submit manuscripts to this special issue.


Volume 32, Number 11 (2016)

New Analytical Methodology and Materials for Mechanobiology

The force be with you, always,” says Grand Master Yoda in Star Wars. But this is not just limited to the world of the popular fiction film. Also in our body, physical force absolutely plays an important role in regulating various biological processes. Hypertension causes vascular hypertrophy and stem cells differentiate to different lineages, depending on the substrate mechanical properties. These facts evoked a research field called “mechanobiology”, which is arousing a fundamental scientific curiosity of researchers concerning various subjects. Mechanobiology research is also important for extending our healthy life expectancy. For example, locomotive syndrome—symptoms caused by insufficient exercise— is one of the biggest challenges for industrialized countries.

In contrast to conventional molecular biology, which considers molecular-level ligand-receptor interactions of the topmost interest, in mechanobiology, we need to pay attentions to global mechanical interactions at multi-scale levels: from proteins, organelles and cells, to tissue and organs. Needless to say, we need a new analytical methodology and materials to realize innovations in this unique research field. We are planning to have a special issue entitled “New Analytical Methodology and Materials for Mechanobiology” in November, 2016, in order to display the cutting edge of recent analytical tools and materials that can be used for various aspects of mechanobiology research. Both basic and application work in mechanobiology will be accepted if they represent novel work that is significant and interesting from the viewpoint of Analytical Sciences. Preliminary results will also be accepted as Notes if they represent novel work of significance and interest. Submitted papers shall be reviewed normally, according to the regular procedure of the journal. As Guest Editors, we would like to invite researchers from a wide range of disciplines to contribute to papers on recent and innovative research.


Volume 32, Number 3 (2016)

Recent Advances in Nanoscale Particles and Structures for Analytical Applications

Recent progress in the design and control of nanoscale structures as well as highly sensitive and/or highly-precise analysis techniques of dynamics occurring at nanoscale fields, have been inspiring separation and/or analysis techniques utilizing nanoparticles or nanostructures. Representatively, noble metal nanoparticles/nanostructures exhibit localized surface plasmon resonance in the ultraviolet to near-infrared region, that explore highly sensitive spectroscopies as well as highly selective, simple or handy analytical tools based on color change. Meanwhile, the formation of functional nanostructures, such as nanoporous materials as well as the utilization of such functional nanomaterials to highly selective reaction or separation, offer effective decomposition of harmful species or recognition/ separation of chemical species. Accordingly, those achievements have been tremendously developing analytical research activities utilizing nanoscale particles or multidimensional structures.

We are planning to have a special issue of Analytical Sciences entitled "Recent Advances in Nanoscale Particles and Structures for Analytical Applications" in March 2016, in order to display the cutting edge of recent nanoscale analytical chemistry fields. Both basic and application works based on new nanoscale particles and structures will be accepted if they represent novel work of significance and interest in analytical chemistry. Submitted papers shall be reviewed normally, according to the regular procedure of the journal. As a Guest Editor, I would like to invite you to contribute a paper on your recent and innovative research.


Volume 32, Number 1 (2016)

Micro/Nanofluidics and Micro/Nanotechnologies for Analytical Chemistry: Fundamental Technologies, Characteristic Phenomena, Applications, and Instrumentation

Research in the field of micro/nanofluidics, in which various chemical functions are integrated in fabricated micro- and nano-space on a centimeter-scale substrate, has progressed rapidly, and innovative achievements and functions have been realized in analytical chemistry. Fundamental technologies including fabrication, fluidic control, and detection were developed, and those technologies have advanced. As a result, not only researchers in the field but also individuals from the general public have come to tap these technologies, and the number of applications has been increasing. In addition, commercialization of the technologies and integrated systems is giving rise to growth in the number of companies engaged in this area worldwide. At present, the microfluidic/microtechnology field is growing rapidly due to the usefulness. Remarkable scientific progress can also be found in the area of nanofluidics which targets 10 − 100 nm space. Distinctive liquid and fluidic properties, induced only in the nanospace, have been identified, and the innovative devices have been developed. This new research field, which is different from the microfluidic field, is now drawing greater interest. The ultrasensitive analysis targeting single cells and single molecules is becoming reality.

We plan to publish a special issue entitled "Micro/Nanofluidics and Micro/Nanotechnologies for Analytical Chemistry: Fundamental Technologies, Characteristic Phenomena, Applications, and Instrumentation" in January 2016 to share recent developments in the rapidly expanding micro/ nanofluidics and related micro/nanotechnologies fields with researchers and our other readers. The topics are technological development, analysis of phenomena (liquid properties, interface properties, fluidic properties, etc.), applications, and instrumentations. We would like to invite researchers and engineers from a wide range of disciplines to contribute papers on recent and innovative research.


Volume 31, Number 11 (2015)

Recent Progress in High Performance Separation

Nowadays, HPLC is recognized as being one of most efficient separation techniques in various analytical fields. In addition to conventional-scale HPLC, capillary HPLC and μ-LC or HPLC on a microchip as well as ultra-high pressure LC or ultra-high performance LC have remarkably progressed in the last decades. Especially, the progress of column technologies, e.g., developments of sub-μm particle size packings and novel stationary phases, and novel separation modes including HILIC is important.

Over thirty years have passed since capillary electrophoresis (CE) was introduced as a high- performance separation method. CE has played important roles in various analytical fields, including the separation of small molecules, DNA and protein analyses, chiral separations, pharmaceutical and biomedical analyses, and environmental analyses. Studies on microchip electrophoresis (MCE) have been also remarkably progressed along with the development of nanotechnology, most commonly recognized as a part of μ-TAS or lab-on-a-chip. CE and MCE are expected to be the most prominent analytical methods at the present stage, owing to their several advantages, e.g., quite small amount of samples to be analyzed, few amounts of organic modifiers in separation solutions, remarkably fewer wastes after the analysis, fast analysis and low energy consumptions.

The editorial board of Analytical Sciences plans to publish a special issue on “Recent Progress in High Performance Separation” in November 2015. This special issue will coordinate original papers dealing with various approaches for improving the performance of HPLC, CE/MCE and other separation techniques as well as applications of these techniques, which will show the current status and future prospects of various separation techniques.


Volume 31, Number 9 (2015)

Cutting-Edge Analytical Chemistry Research by Women Scientists

The participation of women in science is increasing and their contribution to knowledge production has been very impressive all over the world, making a real difference in scientific development; however, the disparity in gender remains. To encourage female researchers to submit papers, we are planning to have a special issue of Analytical Sciences entitled, "Cutting- Edge Analytical Chemistry Research by Women Scientists", in September 2015. This special issue will showcase female senior scientists who are directors of their laboratories and young female scientists. The issue is accepting primary research articles, reviews and notes in which female researchers are the lead or corresponding authors. Senior women scientists are invited to submit original research articles or review articles on topics related to their major research fields, including cutting-edge research in analytical chemistry. Young women scientists are invited to submit primary research articles or notes containing preliminary results of significant, interesting and novel phenomena or systems. Both basic and applied research works will be accepted. Submitted papers shall be reviewed according to the regular procedure of the journal. A special award from the editors will be given for outstanding papers. As guest editors, we would like to invite you to contribute a paper on your recent and innovative research.


Volume 31, Number 7 (2015)

Electroanalysis with New Electrode Materials and Advanced Electrochemical Devices

The variety of new electrode materials and devices have increased rapidly due to the development of nanomaterials and micro and nano electrochemical devices. As new electrode materials, metal nanoparticle-modified electrodes and new carbon-based electrodes (including boron doped diamond-, carbon nanotube- and graphene-based electrodes) have been recently developed for use in electrochemical detectors, chemical and biochemical sensors. New probe molecules have also been developed for the electrochemiluminescence method, which combines electrochemical activation and high sensitivity optical measurement. Various kinds of devices have been developed as well, such as for scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM), or various array technologies such as microarray electrodes, BioFET and BioLSI. Since electrochemical analysis is highly sensitive despite its simple and inexpensive method, it is expected to find applications in many fields such as for healthcare devices, and bio and environmental analyses in the near future. A special issue of Analytical Sciences entitled, "Electroanalysis with New Electrode Materials and Advanced Electrochemical Devices" is scheduled for publication in July 2015 to highlight the cutting edge technologies in the electroanalytical chemistry field. Both basic and application works based on new electrode materials, electrochemical probes and devices will be accepted if they represent novel work of significance and interest. Submitted papers shall be reviewed, according to the regular procedure of the journal. As a Guest Editor, I would like to invite you to contribute a paper on your recent and innovative research.


Volume 31, Number 4 (2015)

Molecular Imaging for Bioanalysis

Recent advancements in the biological research have depended strongly the basic analytical methods and technologies. This is especially true for DNA sequencing technologies for genome research and mass spectrometry for proteome analysis. In addition, the development of "molecular imaging", which enables visualization of biomolecules in living cells and animals, has been revolutionized. Molecular imaging holds a considerable promise for applications in different scientific fields such as basic biology, medical science and medicinal chemistry. This suggests that analytical chemistry has great potential to contribute more in those fields and to lead those biological fields to a new era. A special issue of Analytical Sciences entitled "Molecular Imaging for Bioanalysis" is scheduled for publication in April 2015 to summarize the recent progress in the imaging fields and the prospects for future.

Specific areas of interest include, but are not limited to, probe design and labeling methods, new materials for molecular imaging, optical and non-optical imaging technologies such as fluorescence and Raman imaging, fMRI and PET imaging, and analysis of imaging data. The issue will include primary research papers as well as overviews of recent technical and methodological developments. Preliminary results will also be accepted as Notes if they represent novel work of significance and interest. Submitted papers shall be reviewed, according to the regular procedure of the journal. As a Guest Editor, I would like to invite you to contribute a paper on your recent and innovative research.


Volume 29, Number 1 (2013)

Young Generation in Analytical Sciences

A decade has passed since the establishment of "Wakate-kouryukai", which is a committee of Young Analytical Scientists of the Japan Society for Analytical Chemistry. In January 2001, an issue entitled "Young Generation in Analytical Sciences" had been formerly edited by members of the predecessor of Wakate-kouryukai, namely, the 21st Century Committee, and published in Analytical Sciences.

Our surroundings have changed substantially over the last decade. Global warming, water and food crises are still remaining issues to be solved. Additional problems, such as risks involving nuclear power plants and soaring prices of rare-earth elements due to an insufficient supply have recently been revealed. These issues should be solved by young scientists who are responsible for future developments in the field of analytical sciences. We are planning to have a special issue of Analytical Sciences entitled "Young Generation in Analytical Sciences" once again in January 2013, in order to show the current activities of young researchers.

The basic policy of this special issue is to support the challenges of young researchers with high morale. Therefore, researchers who were born in and after 1972 are eligible to be the first authors of a paper. Preliminary results will also be accepted as Notes if they represent novel work of significance and interest. Submitted papers shall be reviewed as usual; according to the regular procedure of the journal. As Guest Editors, we would like to invite you to contribute a paper on your recent and innovative research.


Volume 28, Number 1 (2012)

Advances in Micro/Nano-Bioanalysis −From Molecular Science to Device Applications−

The recent development of bioanalytical techniques involving the development of highly sensitive or selective analytical methods based on nano-scale materials/molecules, and the development of new analytical tools or methods based on micro/nano-devices have progressed with remarkable success. For example, nano particles or nano-scale periodic structure for ultra-sensitive detection, bioprobe-molecules for visualizing biological events in living cells, and monolithic material possessing nano-scale pores for use in high-performance separation have contributed to the development of new analytical methods that exceeded the performance of the conventional ones. On the other hand, micro analytical devices prepared by “top down” micro fabrication technology are expected to be promising micro analytical tools in the near future. In the beginning of this research field, many studies focused on the use of characteristics provided by micro-scale fluids or spaces. However, the recent research stream focuses on the integration of chemical functions using various immobilization or patterning techniques, and fusion with nano-scale materials/molecules described above or conventional micro analytical techniques such as flow-injection analysis, capillary electrophoresis, and micro electrodes, to develop useful micro bioanalytical devices such as single-cell analysis devices or high-performance diagnosis devices. Furthermore, the recent development of nano-scale devices possessing nano-scale spaces or nano patterns of material/molecule would lead to the exploration of nano scale-specific new phenomena by both “top down” and “bottom up” approaches; also, application to new analytical methods or tools are expected.

From these points of view, the editorial committee of Analytical Sciences decided to publish a special issue in January 2012, which is entitled “Advances in Micro/Nano-Bioanalysis −From Molecular Science to Device Applications− ”. Reviews, Original Papers, and Notes related to the recent progress of micro/nano-bioanalysis including basic research on the high-performance materials/molecules, the development of new devices or new micro/nano-fabrication techniques for use in various bioanalysis are considered. Especially, submissions from young researchers are welcome. The submitted papers shall be reviewed normally, according to the regular procedure of the journal.


Volume 27, Number 1 (2011)

Advances in Scanning Probe Microscopies for Nanomaterial Analyses −From Basic Science to Quantitative Nanofunctionality Analyses−

More than a quarter-century has passed since the invention of the scanning probe microscope (SPM), represented by the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and the atomic force- microscope (AFM). Since then various SPM characterization methods have been derived from STM and AFM. Nowadays, SPM is being applied to wide research fields and materials, such as semiconductors, metal, ceramics, supra-molecules, polymers, deoxyribonucleic acid, proteins, cells and so on. Compared with other microscopies with a spatial resolution at the nanoscale, SPM has a superior analytical capability of a wide range of physical quantities and features, such as size, shape, atomic structure, electronic state, mechanical property, optical property, and magnetic property of matter and material. SPM is being used not only as a basic research analysis tool of materials, but is also being employed as inspection tools indispensable for various industries. For example, SPM has firmed its status as a quantitative characterization tool at the nanoscale, which is indispensable for developing and inspecting semiconductor devices and magnetic-storage devices. As the popularization of SPM develops, the research and development of SPMs for the direct characterization and evaluation of the physical properties and functions of novel nanoscale materials has been growing greatly in recent years. Also, the establishment and standardization of quantitative analysis methods for a reliable and reproducible characterization of nanoscale properties obtained by SPM are strongly demanded.

Moreover, the importance of theoretical research and computational science has been increased significantly, since they can clarify the interactions between probes and surfaces at the nanoscale, giving correct interpretations of data.

From such a background, the editorial committee of Analytical Sciences has determined to publish a special issue in January 2011, which is entitled “Advances in Scanning Probe Microscopies for Nanomaterial Analyses”. Reviews, Original Papers, and Notes related to the recent development of SPM nanocharacterization methods for advanced materials and devices will be included. Papers on SPM quantitative analysis, standardization of SPM, simulation and modeling based on theory and computational science, and other related matters are welcomed. The submitted papers shall be reviewed normally, according to the regular procedure of the journal.


Volume 26, Number 2 (2010)

Advances in Surface Chemical Analysis −From Fundamentals to Standardization−

The concept of surface analysis was established over a half century ago. Nowadays, surface and near-surface layer chemical analysis with electrons, ions, x-rays, and light is used extensively for a wide range of purposes in both science and technology. Technologically, surface and interface properties are crucial for the fabrication and performance of a wide range of advanced materials. Surface chemical analysis has been used in these applications as a key technology for characterization. Advances have been supported by the development of new instruments and progress in understanding electron transport in solids, the theory of inner-shell ionization and so on.

The Editorial Board of Analytical Sciences plans to publish a special issue, entitled “Advances in Surface Chemical Analysis −From Fundamentals to Standardization−”, in February, 2010. This issue will focus on both fundamental and applied research in the fields of surface and near-surface layer analysis with electrons, ions, x−rays, and light. As the Guest Editor, I am inviting the submission of papers concerning recent research work relevant to this theme.

The deadline for submitting papers is the end of August, 2009. Those who wish to submit their paper(s) (Reviews, Original Papers, or Notes), on this occasion are kindly requested to notify us of your tentative paper(s) title(s) by the end of June, 2009. Submitted papers will be peer-reviewed according to the usual process of Analytical Sciences. Please feel free to contact the guest editor. We are looking forward to your contributions.


Volume 25, Number 8 (2009)

Advances in Bioanalysis −New Analytical Technologies and Their Applications−

Life-science research is now moving from genomics towards a postgenomic era with transcriptomics, metabolomics and proteomics. The bioanalytical field is expected to play a crucial role. Novel innovative and high-performance bioanalytical techniques provide the means for new applications in medicine and life science.

The Editorial Board of Analytical Sciences plans to publish a special issue, entitled "Advances in Bioanalysis", in August 2009. This issue will focus on both fundamental and applied research in the field of bioanalytical analysis. As the Guest Editor, I am inviting the submission of papers concerning recent research work relevant to this theme.

The deadline for submitting papers is the end of February, 2009. Those who wish to submit their paper(s) (Reviews, Original Papers, or Notes), on this occasion are kindly requested to notify us of your tentative paper(s) title(s) by the end of December, 2008. Submitted papers will be peerreviewed according to the usual process of Analytical Sciences. Please feel free to contact the guest editor. We are looking forward to your contributions.


Volume 25, Number 2 (2009)

Analytical Prospects of Nanoparticles and Nanointerfaces

Molecular recognition often occurs at an interface. A particle can be a useful platform for molecular separation and construction of sensing devices. Although interfaces and particles have thus played essential roles in the developments of analytical methodology, analytical chemists have not necessarily paid special attention to such aspects when working on macroscopic scales. Recent developments of instrumental measurements have allowed us to work on the molecular bases, and nanotechnology provides various materials designed in the micro- to nanometer dimensions. Analytical chemists should open new frontiers by dealing with nanomaterials in proper ways and should facilitate deeper understanding of the chemistry taking place therein through the developments of novel approaches to nanospaces.

The Editorial Board of Analytical Sciences plans to publish a special issue entitled "Analytical Prospects of Nanoparticles and Nanointerfaces" in February 2009. As the Guest Editor, I would like to invite you to submit a paper of your recent research work relevant to this theme. A simple application of nanomaterials to accomplished methods will not be considered for publication, unless a novel idea or concept is involved. If a clear perspective into the nano-dimension is indicated, work done on larger scales can also be included.

The deadline for submitting papers (Reviews, Original Papers, or Notes) is August 29, 2008. Those who are interested in this issue are encouraged to inform the guest editor of the tentative title of the paper by E-mail by June 30, 2008. Submitted papers will be peer-reviewed basically following the usual process of the Journal. Earlier submission will be welcomed to expedite the publication procedure. Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions on this matter. We are looking forward to your contributions.


Volume 24, Number 10 (2008)

Ionic Liquids
-Properties and Analytical Applications-

Room-temperature ionic liquids, non-volatile and non-flammable, are considered to be environment-friendly green solvents. The usage as alternatives to molecular solvents for organic and inorganic syntheses, separation and purification, and also as functional materials for electrochemical devices, CO2 absorber, lubricants, etc. has been extensively studied. The number of reported papers is increasing, particularly in the field of analytical chemistry, among others.

Therefore, the Editorial Board of Analytical Sciences plans to publish a special issue on "Ionic Liquids—Properties and Analytical Applications—" in October, 2008. This special issue will focus on (1) syntheses and structure, (2) acid-base, redox and other liquid properties, (3) solvation and complexation of ions and molecules, (4) extraction, separation and other analytical applications, and (5) electrochemical and biochemical applications, of ionic liquids. This issue welcomes original papers concerning solvent properties and applications of room-temperature ionic liquids.

The deadline for the submission of papers is the end of March, 2008. Those who wish to submit their paper(s) (Original Papers, Notes, or Reviews), on this occasion are kindly requested to notify us of your tentative title(s) of the paper(s) by the end of January, 2008. Submitted papers will be peer-reviewed according to the usual process of Analytical Sciences. Please feel free to contact the guest editor.


Volume 24, Number 1 (2008)

Innovations in Analytical Sciences

It is essential for the discovery and elucidation of new phenomena to develop novel analytical techniques. The aim of innovations in analytical sciences is to create new technologies that allow unknown phenomena or chemical species to be measurable and detectable. There are many phenomena or materials that can be uncovered only by novel analytical technologies. The innovations include the development of analytical tools in relation to topics such as the structure and function analysis of biological matters and the life-related phenomena, the atomic and molecular scale measurements at the surfaces and interfaces, and the environmental and ecosystems analysis. The topics also include peripheral technologies that offer potential breakthroughs in measurement and analysis, for example, in the area of sample pretreatments, new analytical reagents, and software.

On the basis of this background information, the journal Analytical Sciences has a plan to publish a special issue entitled, "Innovations in Analytical Sciences" under the supervision of Dr. Shigeru Terabe (Emeritus Prof. University of Hyogo) as a guest editor.

The editorial committee cordially invites you to contribute your paper (Original Papers, Short Reviews, and Notes) on innovations in measurement analysis for this special issue of Analytical Sciences. The review process is the same as that of the normal issue. Please submit your paper to the e-mail address of the guest editor listed below.


Volume 23, Number 7 (2007)

Advanced Vibrational Spectroscopy   −from Near-infrared to Terahertz−

Recent rapid development in vibrational spectroscopy has greatly encouraged its application to analytical chemistry. One direction of the development of vibrational spectroscopy is an extension of wavelength regions. This has brought rapid advancement of vibrational spectroscopy particularly in near-infrared region and Terahertz region. Another direction is progress in imaging, nondestructive analysis, and in-situ analysis. It has facilitated to analysis as it is without destruction. Meanwhile, there have been great strides made in the studies of Raman spectroscopy, for example, like femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy, CARS microscopy, near-field Raman spectroscopy and SERS. The special issue on vibrational analysis has been planned in these circumstances. Papers are welcome on new experimental techniques, new spectral analysis methods, and new applications to analytical chemistry for near-infrared, infrared, Terahertz, and Raman spectroscopy.